How Hearing Aids Are Programmed

For the millions of people around the world who suffer from some form of hearing impairment, one of the tools that they can use to help themselves interpret sounds better is a hearing aid. These devices give the user the ability to take in and listen to sounds with an individually-built hearing system. By going to an audiologist and working with them to establish your specific needs, a person can have better hearing outcomes than ever before. That is why we want to take a closer look at how hearing aids are programmed: to help every wearer have a better understanding of the capabilities of the devices and the work it takes to make them function.

What Factors Can Be Adjusted?

For most people, the list of things that ask their audiologist is short until they see the ways that each one of these aspects can impact their overall hearing. Patients usually begin by asking to change the level of environment sounds that are let into the hearing aid device. Some of the other more common sound options that are changed are volume, frequency, compression values, as well as max power output on the part of the device. Remember that not every hearing aid can adjust all of these options.

Processing Time

For people who suffer from hearing loss, there are a variety of different reasons why you need to go to have your hearing aid updated. In times past, there was no way for you to have your hearing aid adjusted, what you bought was what you got. Now, you have the chance to have over one hundred different settings tweaked so that they can give you the absolute best hearing health outcomes. This necessitates that the person with hearing impairment goes to a hearing specialist to have their device properly programmed for them. This is a rather long process for some, and it can still require future updates as your brain become acclimated to the new means of sound imparting. Keep in mind that all of this tumultuous early stage will be well worth it once you have the chance to have the best hearing possible.

Programming Hearing Aids

Via real ear measurements, mind mapping and environmental simulations, a listening device can be custom made to best suit a person with hearing loss. Real ear probe micro-phones can perceive the amount of sound traveling to the eardrum so the physician can be precise in his work. Visible speech mapping informs the doctor how a number of sounds reach the eardrum. This is an amazing replacement to traditional measurements as the hearing aids of today can be of great help in reducing noise and response trimming algorithms. In the real programming procedure, many physicians use a surround sound program to replicate actual noise from the environment and make changes based on real time response. This surround system can replicate crowd sounds to ascertain what they will do to manage noise reduction. This feature is quite helpful as most people with hearing devices say they perform better when there is silence but as soon as they go to crowded places, they have to struggle with all the background noises. The hearing aid programming procedure requires the right hardware, cables and cables to link to the hearing device. Most individuals learn how to program their hearing devices but the device can be quite expensive and its accuracy level goes down. It is always a good idea to have a professional audiologist perform this important procedure for the purpose of hearing health.

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Choosing Between Hearing Aid Replacement or Repair

One of our most frequently asked questions is, “My hearing aid is damaged or is not working as well as it used to – should I have it repaired, or get a new one?” Presented with only that amount of information, we have to answer truthfully, “Depends.” This is an individual decision, and the “ideal answer” is as individual as the individuals who ask it.

An important thing to consider is that all hearing aids – no matter how expensive they were or how well they were crafted – will at times begin to work less effectively, or break. The environment that hearing aids operate in – your ear canals – is an inhospitable one for complex electronic devices, full of ear wax (cerumen) and moisture. Ear wax is produced naturally, and we need it because it safeguards the lining of our ear canals, but it can “gum up the inner workings” of hearing aids; similarly, residual moisture is natural after swimming or showering, but it too can harm hearing aids. In addition, there is obviously the potential for breakage due to an accident or dropping the aids, and the internal tubing and other components inevitably break down over time, so after several years you can count on your aids needing repair or replacement.

Likely the major factor you should consider when making the “replace or repair” decision is how you feel about your present hearing aids – do you like them, and the sound quality they produce? If you do (as a lot of wearers of older analog hearing aids do), it may be easier for you to have them fixed rather than switch to newer digital hearing aids with a different set of sound characteristics.

One more consideration, of course, is price – new hearing aids might cost thousands, but fixing your existing aids might cost only a couple of hundred dollars. The part we can’t answer in this article is the impact of insurance. Some insurance policies include replacements, but not repairs or have varying policies on full or partial coverage.

Another question that arises if you choose to have your hearing aids repaired is, “Do I return them to the store where I purchased them, or send them to a repair lab myself?” There are several advantages taking them to a local hearing instrument specialist versus working with a distant repair lab directly. First off all, they can establish if repairs are actually necessary. Second, they may be able to get the repairs done on-site decreasing the amount of time you do not have your hearing aid. If they need to send the hearing aid back to the manufacturer or outside lab for major repairs, they’ll make the process easy for you and you might even get a better rate because they work in bulk.

If you decide to replace your hearing aid, you’ll have many innovative options to look at since the last time you shopped for one. More recent digital hearing aids have additional features that might help your hearing and can be more easily programmed to work the way you want them to. The answer to this “replace or repair” question is still your responsibility, but hopefully the information we have provided will help you.

Are You Ready to Get Started?

Great! Just fill out the short form below to schedule your appointment.


Phone Number: *
 
Email: *
Availability: *

Please reserve one hour for a initial appointment on new clients.

How Hearing Aids Are Programmed

For the millions of people around the world who suffer from some form of hearing impairment, one of the tools that they can use to help themselves interpret sounds better is a hearing aid. These devices give the user the ability to take in and listen to sounds with an individually-built hearing system. By going to an audiologist and working with them to establish your specific needs, a person can have better hearing outcomes than ever before. That is why we want to take a closer look at how hearing aids are programmed: to help every wearer have a better understanding of the capabilities of the devices and the work it takes to make them function.

What Factors Can Be Adjusted?

For most people, the list of things that ask their audiologist is short until they see the ways that each one of these aspects can impact their overall hearing. Patients usually begin by asking to change the level of environment sounds that are let into the hearing aid device. Some of the other more common sound options that are changed are volume, frequency, compression values, as well as max power output on the part of the device. Remember that not every hearing aid can adjust all of these options.

Processing Time

For people who suffer from hearing loss, there are a variety of different reasons why you need to go to have your hearing aid updated. In times past, there was no way for you to have your hearing aid adjusted, what you bought was what you got. Now, you have the chance to have over one hundred different settings tweaked so that they can give you the absolute best hearing health outcomes. This necessitates that the person with hearing impairment goes to a hearing specialist to have their device properly programmed for them. This is a rather long process for some, and it can still require future updates as your brain become acclimated to the new means of sound imparting. Keep in mind that all of this tumultuous early stage will be well worth it once you have the chance to have the best hearing possible.

Programming Hearing Aids

Via real ear measurements, mind mapping and environmental simulations, a listening device can be custom made to best suit a person with hearing loss. Real ear probe micro-phones can perceive the amount of sound traveling to the eardrum so the physician can be precise in his work. Visible speech mapping informs the doctor how a number of sounds reach the eardrum. This is an amazing replacement to traditional measurements as the hearing aids of today can be of great help in reducing noise and response trimming algorithms. In the real programming procedure, many physicians use a surround sound program to replicate actual noise from the environment and make changes based on real time response. This surround system can replicate crowd sounds to ascertain what they will do to manage noise reduction. This feature is quite helpful as most people with hearing devices say they perform better when there is silence but as soon as they go to crowded places, they have to struggle with all the background noises. The hearing aid programming procedure requires the right hardware, cables and cables to link to the hearing device. Most individuals learn how to program their hearing devices but the device can be quite expensive and its accuracy level goes down. It is always a good idea to have a professional audiologist perform this important procedure for the purpose of hearing health.

Are You Ready to Get Started?

Great! Just fill out the short form below to schedule your appointment.


Phone Number: *
 
Email: *
Availability: *

Please reserve one hour for a initial appointment on new clients.

What Size of Battery Should I Buy for My Hearing Aid?

There is no one answer to the question “Which hearing aid battery kind do I buy?” because hearing aid styles and the batteries they operate on common in many varieties. The simplest scenario to address is if you already own a hearing aid; if that’s the case, consult the manual that was included with it or contact the providers who fit it for you to determine the correct battery type. In the event that you don’t own a hearing aid yet and are looking to choose which model and type is right for you, do a little research to help you decide. Different sizes of hearing aid batteries vary greatly in price, and in the life of the battery, so your selection of hearing aid will affect how much money you spend over time to use it.

Thankfully, hearing aid battery packaging utilizes a standardized system of color coding. The sizes are all standard across manufacturers, so the color on the packaging is a trustworthy indication of the battery size and type.

The primary sizes and types to be aware of are:

A brown color code signifies a Size 312 battery, commonly found in In-The-Ear (ITE) and In-The-Canal (ITC) styles of hearing aids; because of their smaller size they have a battery life near 175 hours.

Orange corresponds to Size 13 hearing aid batteries. These batteries are intermediate in size and hold a charge for about 240 hours. This size battery is common in In-the-Ear (ITE) and Behind-the-Ear (BTE) hearing aids.

The blue color code always identifies Size 675 batteries, which are generally used in cochlear implants and larger Behind-The-Ear (BTE) type hearing aids; these batteries have a typical life of about 300 hours.

Batteries that have a color code of yellow are Size 10, and may be the easiest to find because they are typically used in In-The-Canal (ITC) and Completely-In-Canal (CIC) types of hearing aids; their battery lifespan is shorter, generally 80 hours.

These 4 battery sizes address most hearing aids, but there are some exceptions that require different batteries. If yours requires one of these different types, most retailers that provide batteries can obtain them for you.

Definitely read your owner’s manual carefully before buying large quantities of hearing aid batteries. If your unit uses rechargeable batteries, you’ll only need disposable batteries as a back up. To keep your batteries fully charged after you purchase them, always store them inside at room temperature and in their original, unopened packages.

Are You Ready to Get Started?

Great! Just fill out the short form below to schedule your appointment.


Phone Number: *
 
Email: *
Availability: *

Please reserve one hour for a initial appointment on new clients.